Food Safety and Sanitation Slogan Posters | Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Activity

food-safety-and-sanitation-slogan-posters family consumer sciences home economics culinary lesson plan activity

Every foods class that I teach starts with teaching or reviewing food safety and sanitation. Students are anxious to get in kitchens so I work to make the sometimes dry information more fun and engaging. I love when students make these posters because the students repeat the slogans to each other throughout the class. I can also see them muttering slogans to themselves as they take a test. They are a great way to brighten up my dull cabinets.

Time

  • 30 minutes to assign posters and give students a good start
  • I assign this project early in the unit and have students present as a review for the unit. I spend about 30 minutes in class to explain the project and give students a start. The remainder can be homework or you can give class work time based on what else you plan for the unit.

Set

  • Start by asking students what you mean by “Never Eat Soggy Waffles.” (North, East, South, West) Explain that sometimes silly phrases, songs, words, or pictures can better help you remember information. Give some examples of your own.
  • Introduce the Foodborne Illness Parody video. Ask the students to pick out different food safety facts from the video.
  • Discuss the video after watching. Quiz students about information from the video and see if they sing it back to you.

Activities

  • Distribute plain paper. Explain that one side will be the checklist and the other will become the poster.
  • Share the expectations slide with the students. They should copy the information to make a checklist for themselves.
  • Share the example slide. Explain how the slide fits all of the expectations.
  • Pass around the topic sign-up list. This step is to make sure there are not too many repeats. The topics align with my new “Food For Today” textbook, but they are general enough to work with any text. Students could also look for facts online.
  • Set the due date for the posters on the day of the test. Students present their posters to review information from the unit.

Materials and links

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Make Your Calories Count | Student Notes for FDA Nutrition Label Reading Resource

Free student notes to accompany FDA nutrition label reading resource presentation notes

When I first started teaching I found this great resource from the Food and Drug Administration (Make Your Calories Count – Use the Nutrition Facts Label for Healthy Weight Management) that guides students through reading a nutrition label. At the time it was a little too basic for my high school students. Now that I teach middle school I have added it to my nutrition curriculum.

My students liked the animation and sound effects but the presentation works just fine muted too.

I have learned pretty quickly that middle schoolers need tools to stay focused so I made notes to help students through the presentation. I also made a practice section to their notes so they can apply what they learn on their favorite snack foods.

A few days before this activity I assign each student to bring in a label from a favorite snack food.  Here is a link to my student notes. You may want to adjust the formatting to suit your needs. I print the document two sheets to a page and two sided so the students are left with a two sided half-sheet document. I’m a pro paper saver.

After every step of the presentation I have students practice using the information using their nutrition label.

We do this presentation with notes as a class. It initiates great conversation. In a pinch it could be used as a web quest but I think it is best to have a teacher close by to remind students of the overall picture of health. I always caution middle schoolers against counting calories and encourage overall good habits instead.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!

Human Reproductive Anatomy: Learn With Brain Rush Webquest | Health, Family and Consumer Sciences, Anatomy Lesson Plan

learn-with-brain-rush-human-reproductive-anatomy-game-worksheet

When planning my upcoming child development unit for my eighth graders, I knew that my standard lecture-based lesson plan like I use with my older health students was not going to cut it. It is such a strange age to discuss “sensitive” topics with some students doing anything for a laugh and some (nearly) dying from embarrassment. Although it is one of the more awkward lessons for both students and teachers, it is nonetheless one of the most important topics we discuss. So I pulled out one of my favorite tech tools, Brain Rush, to help. Brain Rush will capitalize on their competitiveness and they might possibly even enjoy this lesson.

Brain Rush is a great choice to teach terms from this unit because it is self-correcting. It will repeat questions students took a long time to answer or answer incorrectly. Because students learn the information independently, you are free to answer more specific questions that will come up for students.

Students may use the short links provided to access each of the different games. If you have a class website you may choose to make the links live for students to access quickly.

I hope you enjoy Brain Rush and that it frees you up with more time for personalized student interaction.

You can download the worksheet with student short links, key, and instructions here.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!