Illustrating Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs with “If You Really Knew Me” Episode | Video Worksheet | Anti-Bullying Curriculum

illustrating-maslows-hierarchy-of-needs-if-you-really-knew-me-video-worksheet

On a Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers Facebook group, someone suggested showing an episode of If You Really Knew Me to illustrate Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. I added an introductory video and created a worksheet to accompany the episode. I hope these materials are helpful to your class!

This activity would be an excellent introduction to Maslow for a high school Psychology class. It provides a brief overview of Maslow’s theory and gives students a practical application. As a Health and Family and Consumer Sciences teacher I use this activity to bridge between our units on personality and mental health. It could also be used as part of a bullying discussion to help students understand underlying reasons for why their classmates may act the way they do. In any class this video and worksheet will help students develop empathy for their classmates.

You can download this lesson’s worksheet here.

Begin by showing the short video (about five minutes) illustrating Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Pause regularly for students to record each level and characteristics of each level.

After the video give students time to answer the reflection questions.

Which level does learning, understanding, and wisdom belong to?

            This is to help students realize that self-actualization is at the very top of the pyramid. In order for students to perform their very best in tasks that require creative thinking they must have the other levels in order.

How does our physical environment affect our emotions?

            This question is to help students recognize that our physical environment, whether at home or school, can affect our self-esteem and how we interact with others. Issues at home can cause us to act out.

To be the best you, what do others need to know about you to reach self-actualization?

This question gives student an opportunity to reflect on struggles they have outside of class that may be contributing to stress or poor classroom performance.

Take some time to discuss the answers with students as they feel comfortable.

Afterwards, introduce the concept of the “If You Really Knew Me” television show. “Challenge Day” is a group that goes into high schools to help students break barriers and cliques and helps them interact in a positive way. Students disclose very personal information that helps students understand what complex classmates they have. It is a very powerful series.

Preview a few episodes to find a school that most relates to your school’s student body makeup to make the experience more powerful. At the time of this publication I was able to download free episodes here. Episodes are also available inexpensively on iTunes.

As students watch the episode, they should record struggles the students face and sort them into which Maslow level they belong. Students may also think of their own examples. An alcoholic parent could fit under Safety and Security. Having a physical deformity could fit under Esteem.

Spend time discussing the episode with your students. Give them time to record “If You Really Knew Me” statements. This is a great tool to get to know your students better!

After this video and worksheet my students complete the “If You Really Knew Me Writing Mini Unit” available on Teachers Pay Teachers.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!

Collaborative Garnish Lab Experience for Family and Consumer Sciences – Home Economics

collaborative garnish lab family consumer sciences home economics

As part of our study of the contrasts to great plate composition students practiced making some simple garnishes.  Continue reading

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!

Color For a Cause Spirit Week Charity Fundraiser Idea

High school students raised money for charity organizations during winter spirit week with their "Color for a Cause" challenge.

I’m so fortunate to work in a two-person department, especially with my inspiring friend and co-worker Vivian. With her fun and energetic personality she makes a great cheerleading coach too.

This year she tried something new for spirit week with great success! Here she is:

As Cheer Coach of the Marion High School Winter Cheerleaders I recommended we try to do something different this year for our Winter Spirit Week. We asked students to dress in specific colors each day to support four specific causes that we selected. Along with dressing up in a different color each day we also had a little spirited competition between the classes which I entitled COLOR FOR A CAUSE. During their mentor time each day they could purchase links to their class chain for .25 cents a link or 4 links for a $1.00. Students could pick their favorite cause and show their school spirit while doing so. It ended up being a great competition between classes with the senior class winning with 454 links to their chain, freshman had 374 links, with juniors chain links being 345 and sophomores 297 links long. Our spirit week raised a total of $391.50. We will be sending the following checks :
Colon Cancer $100
Alzheimer Disease $100
Breast Cancer $120
Suicide Prevention $50
MHS Spirit Fund $21.50

What a great idea that I had to pass along. This would be a great for Family and Consumer Sciences with FCCLA chapters. Think of the wonderful initiatives you could bring attention to!

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!