Primal Cut Collaborative Poster Project | Family and Consumer Sciences | Agriculture

primal-cuts-beef-butcher-poster

The big picture I want my students to take from our meat unit is being able to choose the correct cooking method for each cut of meat. Knowing this has to do with knowing where the muscle is located on the animal and whether it is used for movement or not.

A project I enjoy that teaches this is making a life size steer diagram of the different primal cuts. (This guy turned out a little small. I had the students do a pig diagram as well because I have a big class this term.)

I project an image of a primal cut diagram on my board and trace the different parts. Each students is assigned a primal cut.

Their poster should include:

  • Bold title of primal cut
  • Landmarks, bones, or muscles included
  • Fabricated cuts commonly made
  • Recommended cooking method
  • Three recipes that use the fabricated cuts (Titles only are sufficient)

This project pairs well with Modern Marvels: Butcher (currently unavailable through Amazon but I am able to get it with my Learn360 membership). Modern Marvels discusses how meat is inspected and regulated, equipment used, and different careers. In the future I would like to arrange for my students to visit a locker but this great documentary is as close as I can get in the meantime. It gives a true picture of what goes into meat production without too much gore.

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Cookie Jar Project For Cookie Types and Definitions | Family and Consumer Sciences

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Fruits and vegetables posters here, magnets here.

I’m a bit of a nerd for vintage pottery and glassware. I start our cookie unit geeking out a little bit about my favorite brands and styles of vintage cookie jars. I have a few on display.

I explain to my students that they are going to be adding to my vintage cookie jar collection. They can design their own cookie jar or look online for vintage inspiration.

Within the cookie jar students need to draw the six types of cookies. Each cookie is labeled with the type and definition. It should be in a shape that exemplifies the cookie. This is what I use for “notes” for the cookie unit.

I love the creativity that the students show with this project! Students really remember what they write. There is a little friendly competition involved too. The finished cookie jars are definitely my favorite decoration.

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How To Remember English System of Volume Measurements | Gallon/Quart/Pint/Cup | Family and Consumer Sciences / Home Economics

gallon quarts pints cups english imperial measurement system family consumer sciences home economics

To help students remember their English system volume measurements I tell them a story about the Great Land of Gallon.

  1. Draw a giant G and tell the students about the Great Land of Gallon
  2. The land is ruled by four queens. (Draw four Q’s inside the G)
  3. Each queen has two children. What do we call children of queens? Princes and princesses! (Draw two p’s inside each Q)
  4. We’re cat people around here. Each prince and princess have two! (Draw two C’s inside each p.)

I admit to the students that my version is very corny and that I’m sure they can think of something better. I ask them to work in groups to make a poster to help remember the English system volume measurements.

The poster must have

  • A saying to remember the measurements in order
  • A drawing of the G-Q-P-C diagram
  • An illustration to help visualize the saying

When the students have a rough draft on scratch paper I give them a sheet of construction paper. Each group’s color corresponds with their kitchen to help emphasize the color coding.

I’m always right- The students have better versions than me. And their posters add bright color to my kitchens!

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!