Category Archives: Technology

Food Adjectives That Are Better Than Good

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Although my students frequently evaluate their food, they struggle to describe it in words other than “good” or some variation.

Kinda good.

Really good.

Not so good.

I recently tried out TagCrowd to help students find words other than good to objectively describe food.

TagCrowd is a word cloud generator much like Wordle, except that I could get it to work in my Chrome browser. It’s features are more limited but it produced fine results. I also like that it did not require log in.

I had students compose an email to me, set a timer for 10 minutes, and told them to type as many food adjectives as they could think of. They could consult the Internet and cooking magazines if they got stuck.

I copied their emails into a TagCrowd box which generated my word cloud, making more frequently used words appear larger. I had the option to embed as HTML or save as PDF.

It would be fun to make a word cloud from all of their former evaluations to see just how big GOOD appeared.

In the future I will project this image while students are evaluating food to give them a better vocabulary to choose from.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!

Google Folder Sharing for Cake Decorating Techniques

Cake Decorating Techniques T22014 by Slidely Slideshow

i-love-you-cake-decoratingI’ve shared before that I use Pinterest in a formative assessment of student’s understanding of basic cake decorating techniques. I still use Pinterest for students to design their client cake, but have changed the basic technique assessment to a collaborative Google folder.

Preparation

  • Make a new folder in Google Drive.
  • Change sharing permissions so that your students can edit. We are a Google school so I specified that anyone in the district with the link can edit.
  • Copy/paste the link into a URL shortener. I used TinyUrl because it allowed me to specify a short link that is easy for students to remember.

Student Instructions

  • Give students a list of images of different techniques to look for:
    • Star tip fill
    • Shell border
    • Rosette
    • Leaf tip
    • Writing tip script
    • Writing tip design
    • Buttercream texture
    • Fondant
  • Encourage them to find unique cakes. Also, keep in mind cakes they would like to make. This helps get them thinking about their cake design to come.
  • As they find images, label each image as “Technique-First-Last” Examples: “Startipfill-Kayla-Pins,” “Leaftip-Kayla-Pins”
  • Drag and drop the images into the shared folder.

Assessment

  • Look through the pictures to see that the students chose correct images for each technique.
  • Upload the images into an easy slide show creator like Slidely.
  • Watch the slideshow as a class and discuss the images.

Students really enjoy this collaborative project. They can see that very basic skills go far in making a professional-looking decorated cake.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!

Kitchen Safety and Sanitation Review with Today’s Meet Technology Tool

To review safety and sanitation with my Bakery students I showed this video from Jamie Oliver’s Home Cooking Skills channel. It shows someone preparing a chicken caesar salad but making many safety and sanitation mistakes along the way. The video reviews are very positive, but many point to the fact that there is no narration or recap to highlight each error.

That can be your student’s jobs!

I set up a “room” in Today’s Meet, which is like a personal temporary chat room. Anyone with the link can participate.

I showed the video and asked students to type all of the errors they saw as they were happening. Technology was great for this as opposed to writing because many students (and I) can type faster than write.

After watching the video in silence, we watched it a second time. I was able to scroll back through their comments and use them to narrate the video, pause, and discuss.

Everyone participated and was involved throughout the activity. It was so much better than just passively watching a video.

I used this as a review for my Bakery students but it would also do well as a pre-assessment for novice cooks.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!