Good Eats: Pretzel Logic | Three-Day Yeast Dough Soft Pretzels Lab

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Oh. My. Goodness. It is recipes like this that make people think Family and Consumer Sciences teachers have magic superpowers. (Does anyone else feel under high pressure at potlucks?) Even if you don’t have time to make these soft yeast dough pretzels with your students, do it for yourself. They are so good!

Good news teachers: This lab can be spread across three days!

Day 1: Students watch “Good Eats: Pretzels Logic” and take notes on their recipe card

  • Recipe is also available on Food Network.
  • This episode is a little confusing because he does the pretzels “wrong” first before correcting it. So have students record the recipe for the dough and then stop recording until he adds in the baking soda step.

Day 2: Students mix dough and review for their test with a Kahoot review game

  • Refrigerate the dough overnight after the first kneading step. We actually froze our dough and that worked well too. Just give it a whole overnight to thaw.

Day 3: Students can form pretzels, boil, and bake.

Do yourself a favor and don’t wait until your yeast bread unit rolls around to make these. 

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Holiday Baking Championship: Not the Holidays Without Pie to Introduce Pie Unit | Family and Consumer Sciences

I came up with this activity much sooner than I’d like to admit. I had been planning on showing Holiday Baking Championship: Not the Holidays Without Pie to review the pie unit instead of to introduce it but ran into a snag with yeast dough and a delay for fog.

For a graphic organizer students divide scratch paper into four quadrants. They are to record pros and cons of store-bought crust, types of pies, and types of crusts. I ended up really liking it as an introduction and will probably do that in the future.

My students really enjoy this series. I use the first episode, Holiday Cookie Madness, to review our cookie unit. It is nice to have something like this in your back pocket for multi-day recipes that leave a spare 10 or 20 minutes.

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!

Food Safety and Sanitation Slogan Posters | Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Activity

food-safety-and-sanitation-slogan-posters family consumer sciences home economics culinary lesson plan activity

Every foods class that I teach starts with teaching or reviewing food safety and sanitation. Students are anxious to get in kitchens so I work to make the sometimes dry information more fun and engaging. I love when students make these posters because the students repeat the slogans to each other throughout the class. I can also see them muttering slogans to themselves as they take a test. They are a great way to brighten up my dull cabinets.

Time

  • 30 minutes to assign posters and give students a good start
  • I assign this project early in the unit and have students present as a review for the unit. I spend about 30 minutes in class to explain the project and give students a start. The remainder can be homework or you can give class work time based on what else you plan for the unit.

Set

  • Start by asking students what you mean by “Never Eat Soggy Waffles.” (North, East, South, West) Explain that sometimes silly phrases, songs, words, or pictures can better help you remember information. Give some examples of your own.
  • Introduce the Foodborne Illness Parody video. Ask the students to pick out different food safety facts from the video.
  • Discuss the video after watching. Quiz students about information from the video and see if they sing it back to you.

Activities

  • Distribute plain paper. Explain that one side will be the checklist and the other will become the poster.
  • Share the expectations slide with the students. They should copy the information to make a checklist for themselves.
  • Share the example slide. Explain how the slide fits all of the expectations.
  • Pass around the topic sign-up list. This step is to make sure there are not too many repeats. The topics align with my new “Food For Today” textbook, but they are general enough to work with any text. Students could also look for facts online.
  • Set the due date for the posters on the day of the test. Students present their posters to review information from the unit.

Materials and links

I hope what you've read is useful! I post here biweekly with resources for Family and Consumer Sciences and Home Economics teachers and share my classroom happenings much more frequently on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up to receive an email when new content is added to my blog. Thanks for visiting!